An analysis of the principle underlying the first amendment in us

After publicly burning an American flag as a means of political protest, Gregory Lee Johnson was convicted of desecrating a flag in violation of Texas law.

An analysis of the principle underlying the first amendment in us

Planning time and activities If you have one day.

Texas v. Johnson | US Law | LII / Legal Information Institute

Begin class with a continuum activity regarding students' opinions about the constitutional amendment to prohibit flag burning. Complete What is Symbolic Speech? When is it Protected? Be sure to go over the last question, which asks students to predict the outcome of the case. If you have two days.

Complete all activities for the first day. On the second day, discuss the activity that students completed for homework. Compare the opinions of students in the class as noted in the continuum activity on day one with the opinions of the American public as a whole.

If you have three days. Complete all activities for the first and second days. On the third day, begin the WebQuest activity. Have students work on the WebQuest for homework. If you have four days. Complete all activities for the first, second, and third days.

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On the fourth day, complete the WebQuest activity. Students can begin writing the letter in class and finish it for homework. Consider wrapping up the case by using the same continuum activity regarding students' opinions about the constitutional amendment to prohibit flag burning that you did on the first day.

This would allow you to determine whether students' opinions had changed. The Political Cartoon Analysis can also be used as a wrap-up feature. The Data Analysis and Political Cartoon Analysis activities could easily be incorporated into a test or quiz.

Honors level students could probably do the WebQuest as a two-day activity, without any of the preceding activities.The most important First Amendment principle in terms of its application in actual litigation is the principle of content neutrality.

Under this principle, the government may not proscribe any expression because of its content, and an otherwise valid regulation will violate the First Amendment if it discriminates between different types of.

In , Supreme Court Justice Brennan wrote, “if there is a bedrock principle underlying the First Amendment, it is that government may not prohibit the expression of an idea simply because society finds the idea offensive or disagreeable.”. The First Amendment in Schools: A Resource Guide.

-First Amendment of the United States Constitution ratified December 15, “If there is a bedrock principle underlying the First Amendment, it is that the Government may not prohibit the expression of an idea simply because society finds the idea itself offensive or .

The United States Constitution, ratified June 21, , was influenced by the writings of Polybius, The first the constitution of nature that includes all of what was called "natural law." The second is the constitution of society, An amendment of a constitution that is made consistently with that constitution.

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If there is a bedrock principle underlying the First Amendment, it is that the government may not prohibit the expression of an idea simply because society finds the idea itself offensive or disagreeable.

Justice William J. Brennan, Jr.

An analysis of the principle underlying the first amendment in us

wrote in the decision that "if there is a bedrock principle underlying the First Amendment, it is that government may not prohibit the expression of an idea simply because society finds the idea offensive or disagreeable.".

First Amendment to the United States Constitution - Wikipedia